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moon

Cards meaning

Seven of Swords
Seven of Swords

Discretion and caution are advised with The Seven Of Swords. Someone is up to no good, so be aware because you may be deceived, or are you the deceiver? This card has a trickster quality to it, you need to be careful of who you trust with your secrets. There are ulterior motives at play, so be aware of any manipulation and unethical behavior. This card represents dishonesty, lies, betrayal, and deception, but it will also teach you to be honest with your intentions.

The High Priestess
The High Priestess

The High Priestess sits, stable as a rock yet fluid as the waters behind her, representing one of the archetypes of femininity. Here, she is the untouchable mystery: the curtains behind her screen our view of the sea, representing the cost of looking upon such power. We may glance it in snatches before the veil falls back into place again. And yet these brief moments of absolute clarity can be some of the most important of our lives, if we heed them and use them.

The Tower
The Tower

It’s unusual for The Tower not to provoke a visceral reaction; this powerful card depicts the fall of a vast edifice built atop a summit of stone that must have seemed utterly indestructible before being struck by an unforeseen bolt of lightning.

The Moon
The Moon

The Moon has long been associated with intuition, feminine mystery, and the unknown, the half-seen. And so it is in the tarot card of the same name: here we see, in the Rider-Waite image, a dog and a wolf howling at the full moon. Before them, a crayfish emerges from the waters of a pool while behind them a path leads back over the mountains, to the world beyond. This symbolizes that however fearful are the manifestations of our inner consciousness, we can be safe in the knowledge that there is a return route open for us. On such a return route we may tread with the new knowledge we have gained beneath the light of The Moon.

The Hierophant
The Hierophant

In this card the Hierophant sits, Pope-like on a raised throne, while two acolytes pay homage to him or await his bidding, In full regalia, with crown and scepter, The Hierophant is the point at which The Emperor and The Magician combine - he is the master of the stage, but, unlike the former, there is no element of service here and, contrary to the latter, The Hierophant does not wield his power lightly or playfully. Depending on the context, this is not necessarily a bad thing.

King of Cups
King of Cups

Unlike the Queen of the suit, the King of Cups is not directly connected to the water: his throne rests upon the waves and an artificial fish, as opposed to a live one, is hung around his neck. The King does not look at his Cup but, instead, holds it with the same grip with which he holds the scepter in his other hand. Here is creativity that has been contained and put to use.